Automobiles and Motorcycles

Automobiles

Automobiles are one of the most popular forms of transportation for people. They serve as a lifeline for people, and they play an important role in modern society.

Auto manufacturers are using highly skilled employees to produce automobiles. These companies also use robotics to manufacture their vehicles.

In the early twentieth century, the auto industry was dominated by the U.S., with the Big Three automobile companies controlling 90 percent of the market. By the mid-1990s, the U.S. had lost its leadership to Japanese companies.

While many consumers may find automobiles to be luxurious, they are very expensive to own. The price of gas increased in the 1970s, as oil shortages made it difficult for car owners to fill up.

As technology advanced, the auto industry was forced to adopt more stringent safety standards. From 1965 to 1995, more than 50 different safety standards were imposed on vehicle manufacturers. Some of these standards regulated brakes, head restraints, lighting, windshields, and even bumper strength.

Automobiles became a favorite target for thieves. One of the reasons is that the vehicles are very valuable. During the 1980s, auto companies were in financial trouble.

Consumer safety advocates began to push for federal auto safety standards in the 1960s. However, many auto companies lobbied against such regulation.

As the auto industry evolved, automakers sought to improve fuel efficiency. This led to stricter standards on hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and emissions.

In 2006, emissions from new motorcycles in the United States were limited to 1.4 grams of hydrocarbons and nitric oxides per km. Moreover, the European Union and California imposed stricter limits on hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.